Help Preserve Caroline County's Rich Heritage

You can help sustain the mission and work of the Caroline County Historical Society. Please consider becoming a Society Partner with your monthly (recurring) donation - as little as $10 per month.  Or make a one-time donation.

Your donation keeps this work going:

 Caroline Digital History Project

  • Archiving, protecting, and indexing hundreds of research projects and thousands of historical document.
  • Publishing searchable online indexes and documents.

 Museum of Rural Life

  • Help maintain our exhibits.
  • Keep our Museum open for visitors.

 Historical Preservation

Protect, preserve, and document many historic buildings in Caroline County.

 

You can also contact us for other options to support CCHS.

Hear All of Our Stories

Gadow Dwelling (c. 1851) Being Restored

Gadow Dwelling (c. 1851) Being Restored

Despite living his life in the local Long Depression (1819-1895), Jesse Hubbard (c. 1811-1879) was determined to erect for his wife and nine children a fine house in the Greek Revival style of architecture, a style then prevalent in the Deep South and other prosperous...

Rebecca Tylor Dwelling (c. 1810) Rescued

Rebecca Tylor Dwelling (c. 1810) Rescued

Despite being a widow with seven children, Rebecca Tylor (1823–1884) was indomitable in addressing local ills: She educated free and enslaved blacks, sought fair treatment for county “Poor House” inmates, demanded equal rights for women, advocated prohibition, took in...

1927 Firehouse Being Exposed and Repurposed

1927 Firehouse Being Exposed and Repurposed

The 1927 Denton Firehouse was the epitome of the bygone era of a true "community project". Based on newspaper reports of the times, virtually every family in the town or vicinity voluntarily contributed money for its construction. In 1954 its size was doubled and in...

Site of Barwick’s Inn (1775) Studied

Site of Barwick’s Inn (1775) Studied

Thee location of Barwick’s Tavern (c. 1775–c. 1790) was part of a colonial commercial cluster of now-vanished buildings that once included a government-mandated tobacco warehouse, a "jail", a ferry crossing and several buildings that all predated 1747. The site is...

James H. Webb Cabin Restored

James H. Webb Cabin Restored

James Webb, a free African-American farmer, built this hand-hewn log home in 1852. He lived here with his enslaved wife, Mary Ann, and their four children, Charles, Elizabeth, John and Ann, and Webb’s father, Henry. The Webbs were members of Mount Pleasant Church....

Ridgely Train Depot (ca. 1892) Restored

Ridgely Train Depot (ca. 1892) Restored

With its broad Victorian porches stripped away and surviving interior woodwork behind cheap wallboard and 1970s partitions, the 1892 depot was recommended by town staff in 2008 as a site for public toilets. As an alternative, the Society prepared concept plans for...

Miller’s Dwelling (c. 1873) Improved

Miller’s Dwelling (c. 1873) Improved

Below the cat-urine-soaked floorboards were termite-riddled floor joists and sill plates, all requiring very costly reconstruction. The dwelling also lacked a septic system, approved well and modern electric service. Immediately after our purchase a decade ago, the...

Plain Dealing (Caroline Poor House) “Salvaged”

Plain Dealing (Caroline Poor House) “Salvaged”

Interior and exterior walls had badly cracked from major structural problems, numerous fire-burned holes punctured the roof, and mold turned the interior ceilings black. After initial spending by the Society for stabilization and documentation, extensive meetings with...

Castle Hall Saved

Castle Hall Saved

Castle Hall in Goldsboro (c. 1781) was dark, vacant, neglected, and deteriorated, with ongoing vandalism that included broken doors, graffiti-sprayed walls and hundreds of smashed window panes, once-proud Castle Hall with the finest colonial woodwork in Caroline sat...

Circa 1829 Slave Dwelling Discovered

Circa 1829 Slave Dwelling Discovered

The Society was offered an “old shed used as a meat house and granary”, but what we discovered had a lot more history: A one-room dwelling that our architectural consultant said was originally a slave dwelling, our dendrochronologist dated to 1829, and court records...